EXHIBITIONS

Markus Lüpertz and A.R. Penck in Dialogue


March 18 – April 29, 2016

+ READ MORE

After the Second World War the tensions of the Cold War between the USSR and the US were most acutely felt in Europe. The US, in the role of the new leading Western power, became increasingly concerned about threats from the USSR, while the communist USSR felt threatened by losing ground in the capitalist-oriented Europe to the US. When the US launched the famous Marshall Plan in 1948 to ‘promote world peace and overall welfare’ aiding the economic recovery of sixteen western European countries, it was an effort to preempt the spread of communist influence into those countries. Germany’s fast economic recovery, often referred to as the ‘Miracle on the Rhine’, with a growth-rate only surpassed by China in recent years, has been attributed to this vast financial support and access to a robust economic network fomented by the US.

Germany, not only divided into two sectors that would later split along the lines of a socialist East (GDR) and a capitalist West (FRG), also suffered from a deep identity crisis and a need to rebuild its understanding as a nation. With the devastation of the war ever present, a new generation was growing that, fueled with discontent over their fathers and the urge to redefine themselves, called for a revolutionary response to the past as well as to the oppressive Cold War environment in the East and West. With mental deprivation in the midst of new material abundance in the West, the country searched for a new political and cultural identity in a society that was constantly beset by memories of a very recent Nazi past that infiltrated all parts of society. The Eastern zone, under the watch of the USSR, established a new socialist ruling system to benefit the working class with little room for dissonance and personal freedom.

Markus Lüpertz, born in 1941 in a northwestern town of former Germany occupied Bohemia (now Czech Republic), moved to West Germany with his parents at the age of eight and grew up in a small town near Düsseldorf. At age 21 and determined to become an artist, he moved to West-Berlin, a small cultural habitat surrounded by the Berlin wall that would attract many: travelers and conchies, political activists and artists. He wrote poems and played the jazz piano while studying art.

During the 1960s and 1970s, when Markus Lüpertz began his artistic career, the world’s trends in art were led by pop-art and minimalism with New York at its epicenter. In response to the defeat and the search for a new identity, Germany developed a cultural confidence in its own creative platform, and was at ease with New York taking a solo lead in the world of art. Germany developed a formative and highly influential center for art, where Markus Lüpertz, alongside of Georg Baselitz, Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, Jörg Immendorff, Gerhard Richter and A.R. Penck, would become a decisive figure. Mile-stones like the groundbreaking and internationally acclaimed documenta platform established in Kassel in 1959 are manifestations of this new-found confidence. The Rhineland with cities like Düsseldorf and Cologne with the first-ever contemporary art fair (1967) supported this development.

Some of Lüpertz’s earliest works, like his iconic ‘Donald Duck’ series, synthesize this unique and critical understanding of painting as well as a consciousness of what was concurrently occurring in the US. These works were soon followed by his critical ‘Helmet’ paintings, which we can find referenced here in the work ‘"Arcadia - White Trunk" (2013) [fig.].

Markus Lüpertz, classically trained, cites as influences Henry Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Edgar Degas, as well as Aristide Maillol, who he explains ‘opened my eyes to this massive reservoir that represents classical art’. While the artist also maintains that only the subconscious can create something truly new and unseen.

The antiquity ideal of ‘the completion of the incomplete’, which provides for the conception of the immaculate torso, has been one of the most important classic concepts exploited by Lüpertz. It informs the starting point for his first and highly acclaimed sculptural work “Standbein-Spielbein” (1983), and can also be traced to his more recent sculptures "Head of Sebastian" (1995) [fig.] and "Head of Titan" (1995) [fig.].

A.R. Penck, born 1939 as Ralf Winkler, decided to be an artist as an adolescent, and began his studies at the art academy in East-Berlin, where his contemporary Georg Baselitz (Hans-Georg Kern) was a dear friend. Penck decided to stay in East Germany when Baselitz moved on to study in West-Berlin in 1957. A.R. Penck would remain in socialist-ruled East Germany until 1980, enduring years of oppressive interference with his work. Through friends he would gain access to information from the West and have his work smuggled out of the country to be internationally exhibited. He was unable to travel himself. While under surveillance by the secret police of East Germany and barred from showing his art, which was regarded as anti-regime propaganda, his work developed into a unique array of forms and symbols, stick figures and cryptic compositions. Having experienced two political systems and the reunification that felt to many like an ideological sellout of the East to the West, cybernetics and coded language is to this day at the forefront in his work. ‘For Penck, the search for a new pictorial language, which he began in the 1960s, goes beyond the simple question of writing in painting. It is an overall strategy, a new language for a new system of thought.¹

Penck’s work features simple compositions: often a few monochrome line strokes, that expose not only the contradictory nature of East German society but, in a condensed form, the historical contradictions of the Cold War era plagued with coercions and conflicts. His work is a result of an intimate struggle to create a “Zeichensprache”, a formative language which can overcome the individual, subjective recognition of context and can thus be universally shared. The paintings “Y” (1978) [fig.] and "Serie über Raum 2" (1982) [fig.] in this exhibition are excellent examples.

The co-existence of unsophisticated, figurative elements and coded symbols allows for dual interpretations: we can appreciate the composition for its primitive, historical qualities or try deciphering the utopian future that its message appears to herald. Penck’s work conveys an equanimity that contemplates a civilized society beyond the Germanic subject: a message on history and society in general. This can also be found in his sculptures, namely presented here by his self-portrait "Self-head I" (1984), which bears a large X on the chest, and the unusual incorporation of everyday objects in the composition of "New York, New York, New York" (1988).

This exhibition at Lee Eugean Gallery provides a look at four decades of artistic production by both artists, showing parallels in their interests in painting and sculpture. Their artistic development even overlapped at times, which for example a portrait of Markus Lüpertz by A.R. Penck "Markus Lüpertz at Night", (1989) [fig.] shows. As Dean of the famous Düsseldorf Art Academy, Lüpertz invited Penck (then already living in West Germany) to lead a painting class. The exhibition also includes an important “Congo” [fig.] painting from Markus Lüpertz from a series that he regarded as a fantastic utopian ideal. To Lüpertz ‘Congo was the Correction of Constructivism’; the theme was originally an idea that Penck had for a German painting show at the Palais de Beaux-Arts in Brussels, and for which he wanted all friends to make paintings on the topic Congo - a provocative idea in Belgium at the time.

Lüpertz and Penck are two of the most important representatives of German Art after the Second World War. The movement of new painting in Germany may have been in part a reaction to the US-led art movement of the late 1960s to early 1980s, but is even more so a new form of expression heralded by a post-war generation that had a highly political and societal focus. Their narrative needed its own voice, vision and independent path of abstraction.

¹from: Annabelle Ténèze: A.R. Penck: Early Works, Michael Werner Gallery, 2016

제 2차 세계대전이 끝나면서 유럽과 미국의 힘의 균형은 이전과 다른 모습으로 전개되었다. 승전국인 미국이 상승세를 탄 반면에 승전국과 패전국이 공존하는 유럽대륙의 각국들은 승자는 승자대로 전쟁의 상처를 치유하느라 어려움을 겪었고, 패자들은 그들대로 파괴의 상처와 패전의 책임이라는 질곡 속에서 어려움을 겪을 수밖에 없었다. 이러한 상황은 사회와 문화의 영역에까지 확대되었으며 결과적으로 뉴욕은 2차 대전을 마무리하면서 파리를 제치고 새로운 세계미술의 중심지로 부상하였다. 


+ READ MORE

2차 대전 직후 유럽은 공산주의 국가인 소련의 위협과 이를 걱정하는 서방의 새로운 맹주인 미국 사이의 긴장을 반영하는 장이었다. 미국은 유럽의 빈곤이 공산주의를 불러올 것이라는 염려로 인해 유럽 16개국의 경제 회복을 지원하는 일명 마샬플랜을 집행하는데, 이 계획 덕분에 독일은 경제적인 회복의 기간을 단축시킬 수 있었다. 1950년대 독일은 최근까지 중국이 보여준 놀라운 경제성장률과 유사하게 연 9.7%의 성장세를 보이기도 하였다. 우리는 이러한 독일의 경제회복을 라인강의 기적이라고 부르기도 한다.

전후 독일의 미술은 신표현주의와 개념미술이라는 두 축을 중심으로 부활을 모색하였으며 이 중심에 독일의 전후세대 예술가들이 있었다. 뤼페르츠와 펭크는 이러한 독일의 재건과 번영의 시기에 청년기를 보낸 작가들이다. 그들이 미술계에 뛰어들게 되는 1960년대와 1970년대는 뉴욕을 중심으로 팝아트나 추상표현주의 경향의 미술이 주도하는 시기였다. 비록 전쟁에 패했지만 전후 복구 과정에서 높은 성장을 달성한 독일은 군사적으로는 발이 묶여있지만 경제와 문화에 있어서는 자신감이 충만하니 미술계에서 뉴욕의 독주를 쉽게 인정하기 어려웠을 것이다.

마르쿠스 뤼페르츠 와 A.R. 펭크(본명: 랄프 윙클러) 는 임멘도르프, 바젤리츠, 키퍼 등과 함께 독일 신표현주의 미술의 1세대를 형성한다. 서양미술사에서 추상표현주의와 팝아트가 뉴욕을 중심으로 전개되면서 유럽은 이전보다 위축된 미술계를 목격하게 되었으며, 이러한 유럽미술의 침체기를 지나면서 1970년대 말부터 1980년대를 거쳐 미국주도의 미술에 대한 반작용으로 나타난 미술운동의 하나가 독일을 중심으로 한 신표현주의 운동이라고 할 수 있다. 독일 신표현주의 미술의 대표 작가들은 이러한 전후 시대를 겪은 작가들로서 독일의 재건을 자랑스럽게 생각하지만 패전국의 역사를 회고하는 것이 금기시된 사회적 분위기 속에서 작품 활동을 해온 작가들이다.

뤼페르츠는 1941년 당시 동독 땅이었던 체코의 서북부 마을에서 태어나 8살 때 부모를 따라 서독으로 망명하여 뒤셀도르프 근처의 소도시에서 자랐다. 1962년에 베를린으로 이주한 작가는 미술대학에서 공부한 것 이외에도 시를 짓고 재즈 피아노를 연주하기도 하였다. 분단된 독일의 양면을 기억하는 젊은 작가에게 현실은 있는 그대로 받아들이기 어려운 것이었다. 동독과 서독 사이의 이데올로기적 차이와 물질적 풍요에도 불구하고 느껴지는 정신적 빈곤, 그리고 무엇보다도 나치 시대의 기억을 멍에처럼 짊어지고 있는 사회에서 정치적, 문화적 자기정체성을 찾기란 여간 고통스러운 일이 아니었을 것이다.

이러한 상황에서 작품활동에 들어간 뤼페르츠가 선택한 방법은 현실 공간에서의 이탈과 격리였다. 작가는 의도적으로 인체의 비례를 왜곡시킨다거나 사물의 자연형태를 변형시키고 거칠고 무계획적인 표현으로 의식적 혹은 무의식적 화법(畫法)의 변혁을 시도하였다. 주제의 선택에 있어서도 작가는 도전을 차용하여 현실을 비유적으로 표현하는 방법을 채택하였다. 뤼페르츠는 회화란 어떤 이념도 표현하지 않고 그 자체로 존재해야 한다고 말하지만 이러한 표현은 예술을 통한 세계의 변화와 인간 사고의 개조를 이룰 수 있다고 생각하는, 유토피아에 대한 가능성을 신봉하는 화가이자 음유시인의 현실에 대한 이데올로기적 방어기재이며 양식적 주관성과 감정의 반영이라고 볼 수도 있다. 1973년 동서독이 UN에 동시가입하는 해에 뤼페르츠는 자신의 시를 통해 ‘예술가는 예언자’라는 자신감을 표현하기도 하였다.

이번 출품작 가운데 뤼페르츠의 [Untitled (Kongo - Korrektur des Konstruktivismus)]는 뤼페르츠와는 개인적인 관련이 별로 없는 콩고라는 주제로부터 출발하지만, 펭크의 권유를 받고 출품한 작품이다. 이 작품은 러시아 혁명 정부가 회화와 조각을 부르주아 미술형식이라는 이유로 부정하고 재료의 사회적 효용성을 강조하는 비재현적 구성을 추구한 시각을 교정한다는 의미로 해석할 수 있다. 그런가 하면 2013년에 그린 [Arkadien- Weißer Stamm]에서는 등을 보이고선 인물의 오른편 바닥에 비례에 맞지 않게 거대하게 표현된 독일 사병의 철모를 통해 전통적인 독일을 연상시키고 있다.

뤼페르츠와 펭크는 독일 신표현주의 화풍을 이끈 대표작가들(본인들은 이러한 표현을 받아들이지 않았지만)이라는 공통점 이외에도 몇 가지 공통점을 갖는다. 두 작가는 어린 시절 동독생활을 경험했고, 나중에 서독이나 유럽과 미국 등으로 창작 무대를 옮긴 점이나 문학과 재즈 음악에 대한 관심 등이 공유된다. 펭크는 드레스덴에서 태어나 1980년까지 동독에서 생활하면서 분단된 독일의 현실을 바라보며 혼란스런 시각을 갖게 된다. 작가는 체제의 억압이나 그로부터 발생하는 절망감 등을 그만의 독특한 조형언어인 막대기 형태의 그림으로 표현하여 비밀리에 서방으로 보냈다. 이러한 그의 창작활동은 동독 비밀경찰에 의해 반체제적 움직임으로 낙인찍혀 감시를 당하기도 했다. 1960년대 초 펭크의 작품들은 거의 단색조에 몇 개의 간단한 선들로 이루어진 단순한 화면 구성을 통해 동독사회의 모순을 지적하면서 강압과 갈등으로 점철된 냉전시대의 역사적 모순을 축약적으로 표현하고 있다. 작가는 이러한 작품을 통해 개별적이고 주관적인 상황 인식을 극복하고 누구나 공유할 수 있는 보편타당성을 지닌 조형언어인 '기호언어(Zeichensprache)'를 만들어내고자 노력하였다. 펭크의 작품에 대해서는 낙서 같은 해학과 자유스러움이 암호 같은 상징과 난해함과 공존하고, 유희적인 동시에 유토피아를 연상시키는 기호화된 형상들로 구성된 화면의 이원적 해석 작업이 요구된다. 수학기호나 암호문자같은 형상들로 구성된 펭크의 회화는 독일적인 주제, 즉 역사와 사회전반에 관한 메시지를 넘어서서 문명화된 사회를 관조하는 냉정함과 상징성을 갖고 있다. 이번에 이유진갤러리에서 열리는 뤼페르츠와 펭크의 2인전에 출품된 작품들을 통해서 관람객들은 2차대전 이후 성장한 독일 신표현주의 예술가들이 바라보는 자아의 현실과 주변의 환경에 대한 시각의 일부분을 엿볼 수 있으며, 여기서 더 나아가 현대사회에서 발견되는 인간 본질의 문제로까지 작품의 이미지와 메시지를 확대시키는 두 작가들의 사유를 공유할 수 있을 것이다.


하계훈 / 미술평론가

Works

Markus Lüpertz and A.R. Penck in Dialogue

March 18 – April 29, 2016

At the end of the Second World War, the balance of power between Old Europe and the United States of America began to shift. While the victorious US advanced economically and became the moral voice on the global stage, Europe suffered from war wounds and devastation. One of the most noticeable effects of this new situation in the social and cultural realms was the emergence of New York as the new standard and international hub for art, replacing the Old World’s Paris.

 After the Second World War the tensions of the Cold War between the USSR and the US were most acutely felt in Europe. The US, in the role of the new leading Western power, became increasingly concerned about threats from the USSR, while the communist USSR felt threatened by losing ground in the capitalist-oriented Europe to the US. When the US launched the famous Marshall Plan in 1948 to ‘promote world peace and overall welfare’ aiding the economic recovery of sixteen western European countries, it was an effort to preempt the spread of communist influence into those countries. Germany’s fast economic recovery, often referred to as the ‘Miracle on the Rhine’, with a growth-rate only surpassed by China in recent years, has been attributed to this vast financial support and access to a robust economic network fomented by the US. 



+ READ MORE

Germany, not only divided into two sectors that would later split along the lines of a socialist East (GDR) and a capitalist West (FRG), also suffered from a deep identity crisis and a need to rebuild its understanding as a nation. With the devastation of the war ever present, a new generation was growing that, fueled with discontent over their fathers and the urge to redefine themselves, called for a revolutionary response to the past as well as to the oppressive Cold War environment in the East and West. With mental deprivation in the midst of new material abundance in the West, the country searched for a new political and cultural identity in a society that was constantly beset by memories of a very recent Nazi past that infiltrated all parts of society. The Eastern zone, under the watch of the USSR, established a new socialist ruling system to benefit the working class with little room for dissonance and personal freedom.

Markus Lüpertz, born in 1941 in a northwestern town of former Germany occupied Bohemia (now Czech Republic), moved to West Germany with his parents at the age of eight and grew up in a small town near Düsseldorf. At age 21 and determined to become an artist, he moved to West-Berlin, a small cultural habitat surrounded by the Berlin wall that would attract many: travelers and conchies, political activists and artists. He wrote poems and played the jazz piano while studying art.

During the 1960s and 1970s, when Markus Lüpertz began his artistic career, the world’s trends in art were led by pop-art and minimalism with New York at its epicenter. In response to the defeat and the search for a new identity, Germany developed a cultural confidence in its own creative platform, and was at ease with New York taking a solo lead in the world of art. Germany developed a formative and highly influential center for art, where Markus Lüpertz, alongside of Georg Baselitz, Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, Jörg Immendorff, Gerhard Richter and A.R. Penck, would become a decisive figure. Mile-stones like the groundbreaking and internationally acclaimed documenta platform established in Kassel in 1959 are manifestations of this new-found confidence. The Rhineland with cities like Düsseldorf and Cologne with the first-ever contemporary art fair (1967) supported this development.

Some of Lüpertz’s earliest works, like his iconic ‘Donald Duck’ series, synthesize this unique and critical understanding of painting as well as a consciousness of what was concurrently occurring in the US. These works were soon followed by his critical ‘Helmet’ paintings, which we can find referenced here in the work ‘"Arcadia - White Trunk" (2013) [fig.]. Markus Lüpertz, classically trained, cites as influences Henry Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Edgar Degas, as well as Aristide Maillol, who he explains ‘opened my eyes to this massive reservoir that represents classical art’. While the artist also maintains that only the subconscious can create something truly new and unseen. The antiquity ideal of ‘the completion of the incomplete’, which provides for the conception of the immaculate torso, has been one of the most important classic concepts exploited by Lüpertz. It informs the starting point for his first and highly acclaimed sculptural work “Standbein-Spielbein” (1983), and can also be traced to his more recent sculptures "Head of Sebastian" (1995) [fig.] and "Head of Titan" (1995) [fig.].

A.R. Penck, born 1939 as Ralf Winkler, decided to be an artist as an adolescent, and began his studies at the art academy in East-Berlin, where his contemporary Georg Baselitz (Hans-Georg Kern) was a dear friend. Penck decided to stay in East Germany when Baselitz moved on to study in West-Berlin in 1957.
A.R. Penck would remain in socialist-ruled East Germany until 1980, enduring years of oppressive interference with his work. Through friends he would gain access to information from the West and have his work smuggled out of the country to be internationally exhibited. He was unable to travel himself. While under surveillance by the secret police of East Germany and barred from showing his art, which was regarded as anti-regime propaganda, his work developed into a unique array of forms and symbols, stick figures and cryptic compositions. Having experienced two political systems and the reunification that felt to many like an ideological sellout of the East to the West, cybernetics and coded language is to this day at the forefront in his work. ‘For Penck, the search for a new pictorial language, which he began in the 1960s, goes beyond the simple question of writing in painting. It is an overall strategy, a new language for a new system of thought."¹
Penck’s work features simple compositions: often a few monochrome line strokes, that expose not only the contradictory nature of East German society but, in a condensed form, the historical contradictions of the Cold War era plagued with coercions and conflicts. His work is a result of an intimate struggle to create a “Zeichensprache”, a formative language which can overcome the individual, subjective recognition of context and can thus be universally shared. The paintings “Y” (1978) [fig.] and "Serie über Raum 2" (1982) [fig.] in this exhibition are excellent examples.
The co-existence of unsophisticated, figurative elements and coded symbols allows for dual interpretations: we can appreciate the composition for its primitive, historical qualities or try deciphering the utopian future that its message appears to herald. Penck’s work conveys an equanimity that contemplates a civilized society beyond the Germanic subject: a message on history and society in general. This can also be found in his sculptures, namely presented here by his self-portrait "Self-head I" (1984), which bears a large X on the chest, and the unusual incorporation of everyday objects in the composition of "New York, New York, New York" (1988). This exhibition at Lee Eugean Gallery provides a look at four decades of artistic production by both artists, showing parallels in their interests in painting and sculpture. Their artistic development even overlapped at times, which for example a portrait of Markus Lüpertz by A.R. Penck "Markus Lüpertz at Night", (1989) [fig.] shows. As Dean of the famous Düsseldorf Art Academy, Lüpertz invited Penck (then already living in West Germany) to lead a painting class. The exhibition also includes an important “Congo” [fig.] painting from Markus Lüpertz from a series that he regarded as a fantastic utopian ideal. To Lüpertz ‘Congo was the Correction of Constructivism’; the theme was originally an idea that Penck had for a German painting show at the Palais de Beaux-Arts in Brussels, and for which he wanted all friends to make paintings on the topic Congo - a provocative idea in Belgium at the time.
Lüpertz and Penck are two of the most important representatives of German Art after the Second World War. The movement of new painting in Germany may have been in part a reaction to the US-led art movement of the late 1960s to early 1980s, but is even more so a new form of expression heralded by a post-war generation that had a highly political and societal focus. Their narrative needed its own voice, vision and independent path of abstraction.

¹from: Annabelle Ténèze: A.R. Penck: Early Works, Michael Werner Gallery, 2016

제 2차 세계대전이 끝나면서 유럽과 미국의 힘의 균형은 이전과 다른 모습으로 전개되었다. 승전국인 미국이 상승세를 탄 반면에 승전국과 패전국이 공존하는 유럽대륙의 각국들은 승자는 승자대로 전쟁의 상처를 치유하느라 어려움을 겪었고, 패자들은 그들대로 파괴의 상처와 패전의 책임이라는 질곡 속에서 어려움을 겪을 수밖에 없었다. 이러한 상황은 사회와 문화의 영역에까지 확대되었으며 결과적으로 뉴욕은 2차 대전을 마무리하면서 파리를 제치고 새로운 세계미술의 중심지로 부상하였다.

2차 대전 직후 유럽은 공산주의 국가인 소련의 위협과 이를 걱정하는 서방의 새로운 맹주인 미국 사이의 긴장을 반영하는 장이었다. 미국은 유럽의 빈곤이 공산주의를 불러올 것이라는 염려로 인해 유럽 16개국의 경제 회복을 지원하는 일명 마샬플랜을 집행하는데, 이 계획 덕분에 독일은 경제적인 회복의 기간을 단축시킬 수 있었다. 1950년대 독일은 최근까지 중국이 보여준 놀라운 경제성장률과 유사하게 연 9.7%의 성장세를 보이기도 하였다. 우리는 이러한 독일의 경제회복을 라인강의 기적이라고 부르기도 한다.

 전후 독일의 미술은 신표현주의와 개념미술이라는 두 축을 중심으로 부활을 모색하였으며 이 중심에 독일의 전후세대 예술가들이 있었다. 뤼페르츠와 펭크는 이러한 독일의 재건과 번영의 시기에 청년기를 보낸 작가들이다. 그들이 미술계에 뛰어들게 되는 1960년대와 1970년대는 뉴욕을 중심으로 팝아트나 추상표현주의 경향의 미술이 주도하는 시기였다. 비록 전쟁에 패했지만 전후 복구 과정에서 높은 성장을 달성한 독일은 군사적으로는 발이 묶여있지만 경제와 문화에 있어서는 자신감이 충만하니 미술계에서 뉴욕의 독주를 쉽게 인정하기 어려웠을 것이다. 



+ READ MORE

마르쿠스 뤼페르츠 와 A.R. 펭크(본명: 랄프 윙클러) 는 임멘도르프, 바젤리츠, 키퍼 등과 함께 독일 신표현주의 미술의 1세대를 형성한다. 서양미술사에서 추상표현주의와 팝아트가 뉴욕을 중심으로 전개되면서 유럽은 이전보다 위축된 미술계를 목격하게 되었으며, 이러한 유럽미술의 침체기를 지나면서 1970년대 말부터 1980년대를 거쳐 미국주도의 미술에 대한 반작용으로 나타난 미술운동의 하나가 독일을 중심으로 한 신표현주의 운동이라고 할 수 있다. 독일 신표현주의 미술의 대표 작가들은 이러한 전후 시대를 겪은 작가들로서 독일의 재건을 자랑스럽게 생각하지만 패전국의 역사를 회고하는 것이 금기시된 사회적 분위기 속에서 작품 활동을 해온 작가들이다.

뤼페르츠는 1941년 당시 동독 땅이었던 체코의 서북부 마을에서 태어나 8살 때 부모를 따라 서독으로 망명하여 뒤셀도르프 근처의 소도시에서 자랐다. 1962년에 베를린으로 이주한 작가는 미술대학에서 공부한 것 이외에도 시를 짓고 재즈 피아노를 연주하기도 하였다. 분단된 독일의 양면을 기억하는 젊은 작가에게 현실은 있는 그대로 받아들이기 어려운 것이었다. 동독과 서독 사이의 이데올로기적 차이와 물질적 풍요에도 불구하고 느껴지는 정신적 빈곤, 그리고 무엇보다도 나치 시대의 기억을 멍에처럼 짊어지고 있는 사회에서 정치적, 문화적 자기정체성을 찾기란 여간 고통스러운 일이 아니었을 것이다.

이러한 상황에서 작품활동에 들어간 뤼페르츠가 선택한 방법은 현실 공간에서의 이탈과 격리였다. 작가는 의도적으로 인체의 비례를 왜곡시킨다거나 사물의 자연형태를 변형시키고 거칠고 무계획적인 표현으로 의식적 혹은 무의식적 화법(畫法)의 변혁을 시도하였다. 주제의 선택에 있어서도 작가는 도전을 차용하여 현실을 비유적으로 표현하는 방법을 채택하였다. 뤼페르츠는 회화란 어떤 이념도 표현하지 않고 그 자체로 존재해야 한다고 말하지만 이러한 표현은 예술을 통한 세계의 변화와 인간 사고의 개조를 이룰 수 있다고 생각하는, 유토피아에 대한 가능성을 신봉하는 화가이자 음유시인의 현실에 대한 이데올로기적 방어기재이며 양식적 주관성과 감정의 반영이라고 볼 수도 있다. 1973년 동서독이 UN에 동시가입하는 해에 뤼페르츠는 자신의 시를 통해 ‘예술가는 예언자’라는 자신감을 표현하기도 하였다.

이번 출품작 가운데 뤼페르츠의 [Untitled (Kongo - Korrektur des Konstruktivismus)]는 뤼페르츠와는 개인적인 관련이 별로 없는 콩고라는 주제로부터 출발하지만, 펭크의 권유를 받고 출품한 작품이다. 이 작품은 러시아 혁명 정부가 회화와 조각을 부르주아 미술형식이라는 이유로 부정하고 재료의 사회적 효용성을 강조하는 비재현적 구성을 추구한 시각을 교정한다는 의미로 해석할 수 있다. 그런가 하면 2013년에 그린 [Arkadien- Weißer Stamm]에서는 등을 보이고선 인물의 오른편 바닥에 비례에 맞지 않게 거대하게 표현된 독일 사병의 철모를 통해 전통적인 독일을 연상시키고 있다.

뤼페르츠와 펭크는 독일 신표현주의 화풍을 이끈 대표작가들(본인들은 이러한 표현을 받아들이지 않았지만)이라는 공통점 이외에도 몇 가지 공통점을 갖는다. 두 작가는 어린 시절 동독생활을 경험했고, 나중에 서독이나 유럽과 미국 등으로 창작 무대를 옮긴 점이나 문학과 재즈 음악에 대한 관심 등이 공유된다. 펭크는 드레스덴에서 태어나 1980년까지 동독에서 생활하면서 분단된 독일의 현실을 바라보며 혼란스런 시각을 갖게 된다. 작가는 체제의 억압이나 그로부터 발생하는 절망감 등을 그만의 독특한 조형언어인 막대기 형태의 그림으로 표현하여 비밀리에 서방으로 보냈다. 이러한 그의 창작활동은 동독 비밀경찰에 의해 반체제적 움직임으로 낙인찍혀 감시를 당하기도 했다. 1960년대 초 펭크의 작품들은 거의 단색조에 몇 개의 간단한 선들로 이루어진 단순한 화면 구성을 통해 동독사회의 모순을 지적하면서 강압과 갈등으로 점철된 냉전시대의 역사적 모순을 축약적으로 표현하고 있다. 작가는 이러한 작품을 통해 개별적이고 주관적인 상황 인식을 극복하고 누구나 공유할 수 있는 보편타당성을 지닌 조형언어인 '기호언어(Zeichensprache)'를 만들어내고자 노력하였다. 펭크의 작품에 대해서는 낙서 같은 해학과 자유스러움이 암호 같은 상징과 난해함과 공존하고, 유희적인 동시에 유토피아를 연상시키는 기호화된 형상들로 구성된 화면의 이원적 해석 작업이 요구된다. 수학기호나 암호문자같은 형상들로 구성된 펭크의 회화는 독일적인 주제, 즉 역사와 사회전반에 관한 메시지를 넘어서서 문명화된 사회를 관조하는 냉정함과 상징성을 갖고 있다. 이번에 이유진갤러리에서 열리는 뤼페르츠와 펭크의 2인전에 출품된 작품들을 통해서 관람객들은 2차대전 이후 성장한 독일 신표현주의 예술가들이 바라보는 자아의 현실과 주변의 환경에 대한 시각의 일부분을 엿볼 수 있으며, 여기서 더 나아가 현대사회에서 발견되는 인간 본질의 문제로까지 작품의 이미지와 메시지를 확대시키는 두 작가들의 사유를 공유할 수 있을 것이다.


하계훈 / 미술평론가

WORKS

+82 2 542 4964

eugean_g@naver.com

17 Apgujeong-ro 77 Gil

Gangnam-gu Seoul Korea

© 2023 LEE EUGEAN GALLERY

+82 2 542 4964
eugean_g@naver.com
17 Apgujeong-ro 77 Gil
Gangnam-gu Seoul Korea
© 2023 LEE EUGEAN GALLERY